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What is Asset Allocation?

By Emeka Ajogbe - Topics: Belgium, Netherlands
This article is published on: 30th September 2019

If you read my previous article, I discussed the importance of diversification in your portfolio and how it is a strategy that can limit your exposure to risk. Another strategy is through asset allocation.

Asset allocation involves dividing an investment portfolio among different asset categories, such as equities, bonds, property, commodities and cash. The process of determining which mix of assets to hold in your portfolio is a very personal one. The asset allocation that works best for you at any given point in your life will depend largely on your time horizon and your ability to tolerate risk.

asset classes

TIME HORIZON
Your time horizon is the expected number of months, years, or decades you will be investing to achieve a particular financial goal. If you have a longer time horizon, you may feel more comfortable taking on a riskier or more volatile investment, because you can wait out slow economic cycles and the inevitable ups and downs of the markets. However, if you are saving for a property or a car, you are less likely to want to take on risk as you have a shorter time horizon.

TOLERATE RISK
I have spoken in more detail about risk, here. However, to summarise, risk tolerance is your ability and willingness to lose some (or all) of your original investment for greater potential returns. More adventurous clients, or those with a high tolerance for risk, are more likely to risk losing money in order to get better returns. My more cautious clients, or those with a low-risk tolerance for risk, are more likely to prefer investments that will preserve the value of their original investment.

THE IMPORTANCE OF ASSET ALLOCATION
By including asset categories with investment returns that move up and down under different market conditions within a portfolio, you can protect against significant losses. Historically, the returns of the three major asset classes (cash, equities and bonds) have not moved up and down at the same time. Market conditions that cause one asset class to do well often cause another asset class to have average or poor returns. By investing in more than one class, you will reduce the risk that you will lose money and your portfolio’s overall investment will have a smoother gradient. If the return in one asset class falls, you could be in a position to counteract your losses with better performance in another asset class.

If you are looking to start investing or review the asset allocation in your existing investments, please contact me either by email emeka.ajogbe@spectrum-ifa.com or phone: +32 494 90 71 72

Article by Emeka Ajogbe

Emeka AjogbeIf you are based in Belgium area you can contact Emeka at: emeka.ajogbe@spectrum-ifa.com for more information. If you are based in another area within Europe, please complete the form below and we will put a local adviser in touch with you.

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