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Viewing posts categorised under: Tax residence

How do I know if I am Portuguese tax resident?

By Mark Quinn - Topics: Portugal, Tax in Portugal, Tax residence
This article is published on: 8th December 2021

08.12.21

A lot of confusion occurs in this area – people often mistakenly believe they have to be in Portugal for at least 183 days to be considered tax resident here, but that is not strictly the case.

The rules state that you are Portuguese tax resident if:

  • you spend more than 183 days in Portugal in any 12-month period (these days do not have to be consecutive)
  • if your habitual/permanent residence is in Portugal i.e. your ‘home’ (there is no minimum day count for this criterion)

Generally a tax payer is Portuguese resident from the ‘first day’ or day of arrival.

If you move to Portugal mid-way through the year, Portugal allows for ‘split-year’ tax treatment. This means that you will only be liable to tax in Portugal from the time you become resident there i.e. the date you permanently move to Portugal up to 31st December. The same principle applies for those who choose to permanently leave Portugal.

This can provide advantageous tax and financial planning opportunities and that is why it is best to seek advice and start planning early. We have separate guides on visas in Portugal and residency that explain the process of becoming resident in more detail.

If you move to Portugal mid-way through the year, Portugal allows for ‘split-year’ tax treatment. This means that you will only be liable to tax in Portugal from the time you are resident there i.e. the date you move permanently move to Portugal up to 31st December. The same principle applies for those who choose to permanently leave Portugal.

This can provide advantageous tax and financial planning opportunities and that is why it is best to seek advice and start planning early.

I’m an Expat in Portugal – where do I pay tax?

By Mark Quinn - Topics: Portugal, Tax in Portugal, Tax residence
This article is published on: 6th December 2021

06.12.21

Many clients I have helped have been paying tax in the wrong country, often because of incorrect advice received in the past, or just because they were not aware of the rules.

It is critical to establish your tax residency position to avoid complications and possible penalties in future. I discuss these issues in this post and my next post later this week, with the latter focusing specifically on Portuguese tax residency.

If you are a Portuguese tax resident you are required to declare, and pay tax on, your worldwide income and gains in Portugal. If you are non-resident, then you are only liable to pay tax in Portugal on Portuguese source income.

If you have assets and/or income in more than one country, you will always have a “controlling tax authority” (CTA). This is not based on where most of your assets are located, where income is earned, ‘where you have always paid tax’ or where you ‘choose to declare tax’. Your CTA is normally the jurisdiction where you spend most time in that given tax year i.e. where you are tax resident.

Having said this, you may have to pay tax in more than one country. For example, if you are permanently living in Portugal and you have rental income generated in the UK, you will have to pay tax on that rental income in the UK first. However, as Portugal is your country of tax residence, you will also have to report the income in Portugal and potentially pay tax. Similarly, if you own and run a UK business, you may have to declare and pay tax and social security in Portugal instead of the UK if you are resident in Portugal.

Paying tax in the wrong country may not only result in heavy penalties but could also mean that you are paying more tax than you should and may affect any state pension, healthcare or social security rights you have.

There are rules in place between most countries to avoid tax being paid twice (double taxation agreements) but generally the highest rate of tax will always remain payable.

Moving to France from the UK: Figuring Out Where You’re a Tax Resident

By Michael Doyle - Topics: France, Moving to France, Tax residence
This article is published on: 18th March 2021

18.03.21

Is the dream of waking up every day to a breakfast of freshly-baked bagels as you look at the Eiffel Tower from your Paris balcony beckoning you? Okay, this might not be exactly what life for the average French resident is like, but living in France often holds appeal for those on the other side of the channel.

Just make sure that the new rules and regulations brought in after the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union don’t catch you out when you move and pay tax somewhere new.

In this series of articles, we’ll be covering a range of tax issues, starting with how to know where you’re a tax resident.

Being a tax resident in France

To be considered a tax resident in France, it must be your “main home.” If this doesn’t apply to you, there are four other conditions that determine whether you can be classed as a tax resident:

  • If you spend more than 183 days of the tax year there (which is the same as the calendar year)
  • If you spend more time in France than elsewhere in the world
  • If a substantial portion of your assets are in France
  • If your principal business activities are based in France
uk inheritance tax

Being a tax resident in the United Kingdom
The same basic principles apply for determining whether you’re classed as a tax resident in the United Kingdom. Your eligibility depends on where you fall in the Statutory Residence Test, which involves three parts: the automatic overseas test, automatic residence test, and sufficient ties test.

These first two tests are pretty simple and involve a few components assessing how many days you spend in and out of the country. However, the sufficient ties test is a little more complex, with various conditions that can be classed as your ties:

  • How much you’ve worked in the UK
  • Having family in the UK
  • Available accommodation in the UK
  • Spending more than 90 days in the UK over the last two years
  • Spending more time in the UK than anywhere else

These aspects all have their own complicated definitions, so it’s best to consult a specialist for more specific advice.

Where are you a resident?
Thanks to the Double Tax Treaty between the UK and France, it’s only possible to be a tax resident of one country at any given point. Plus, in addition to both countries’ criteria, the Tax Treaty has its own “tie-breaker” rules.

Relying on your own interpretation of the criteria or your predictions for where you’ll spend the most time in the future is riskier than you might think. Unexpected circumstances like illness can alter your plans, and you may misinterpret the rules or definitions set by authorities.

As you can see, although figuring out where you’re a tax resident sounds simple, it can be complicated if you’re frequently moving between and conducting business in both countries. To protect your finances and your peace of mind, it’s best to arrange an appointment with a professional.