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Viewing posts categorised under: Switzerland

The Spectrum IFA Group and Blackden Financial join forces

By Spectrum IFA - Topics: Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain, Spectrum-IFA Group, Switzerland
This article is published on: 26th May 2020

26.05.20

One of Europe’s leading expatriate advisory companies today announced the acquisition of a 50% shareholding in Geneva based financial planners Blackden Financial, the transaction having been concluded on Friday following discussions which began last year.

The move forms part of Spectrum’s ongoing strategic growth in Europe and expands its existing Swiss operation based in Lausanne. Blackden’s name, office and personnel will be retained.

Spectrum, established in 2003, specialises in financial planning for English speaking expatriates across Europe, operating from twelve regional offices in France, Spain, Switzerland, Italy, Belgium and Luxembourg. Blackden (also founded in 2003) operates exclusively in Switzerland from its central Geneva premises, providing investment, pension and savings solutions to a predominantly high net worth expatriate client base.

Spectrum Director, Chris Tagg, commented “Having observed Blackden Financial’s success over many years, we recognise the team’s disciplined advice process, high professional standards and commitment to long term client service. We are pleased to be investing in a company, and in people, knowing that the essential features of good business practice are already in place. We look forward to continuing the growth of our expatriate financial planning services across Switzerland.”

“The stake in Blackden allows Spectrum to further develop its Swiss based expatriate investment and tax planning capabilities, whilst giving Blackden access to locally compliant solutions in some of Spectrum’s EU markets including France, Italy and Spain.”

Chris Marriott, founder and CEO of Blackden, added “Having specialised in advising Swiss based expats for the last 17 years, we are delighted to complete this deal, which complements and strengthens our presence locally, and look forward to Spectrum’s involvement in the next phase of our business development.”

Michael Lodhi, Spectrum’s Chief Executive Officer and co-founder said “I have known Chris Marriott for more than 15 years, we were instrumental in the creation of The Federation of European Independent Financial Advisers (FEIFA) and I am delighted that we can now work together on a commercial basis.”

Difficult times & planning opportunities for investors

By Robbin Davies - Topics: investment diversification, Investment Risk, Investments, Switzerland
This article is published on: 8th April 2020

08.04.20

During this recent period of uncertainty for investors, I thought it might be of help if I gave a few insights as to possible “Safe Havens” for Swiss and neighboring French-domiciledinvestors, together with a personal appraisal of where danger exists, and how to avoid it.

Many of the Swiss insurance companies have brought out innovative savings plans which include capital protection at maturity, often combined with tax-efficient incentives supported by the tax authorities. As you will probably know, each Canton in Switzerland has a slightly different tax treatment, which can however be quite significant, whilst federal regulations are standardised throughout the country. Taking advantage of these concessions is well-worth the time and effort, and at Spectrum we have almost 15 years of experience in advising and helping both new arrivals, and long-term residents.

For all income earners in Switzerland, or those living in nearby France but working in Switzerland, there are tax-efficient solutions with the safety of not only a minimum return, but also, quite frequently, with the flexibility to adjust terms to changing circumstances. Investing or saving is not designed for short-term, and in many ways it is a form of financial disciplinewhich rewards those that “stay the journey”.

The current world-wide Covid-19 virus, once tamed, will very probably change the way the developed world thinks, and works, in the future. Remote working from home will become the norm for certain organisations, reducing pollution, increasing productivity and allowing freedom for commuters to structure their time more efficiently. This demographic change will revolutionise the corporate world.

Why is this relevant to saving and investing? Because by planning ahead, and putting in place the foundation of a portable, secure and viable investment programme it will allow you and your family to have security in the future. It is quite likely that many existing corporations and businesses will merge with current rivals, with there being “safety in numbers”. Others will be bought by better orientated competitors.

Spectrum has access to various insurance-driven products which are able to both protect your assets at the current time, yet also give you a platform for unit-cost averaging when adding in funds in the coming months and years. The payments can be made “ad hoc” – as and when you feel comfortable with the stability of the markets at that time – or can be fed-in on a regular quarterly or semi-annual basis – which smooths the volatility i.e. you no longer have to “time the market”, but instead have “time-in-the-market” working in your favour. Depending on your fiscal status, some of these products can be partially tax-deductible, or tax-deferred, which is the aim and strategy for medium-term investing. Quite clearly not all cases are the same, but we have the experience and knowledge to be able to offer you alternatives to simply leaving your assets in a bank account – currently giving virtually zero interest.

Wishing you good health, keep safe, and we are here to help advise and make suggestions if you would like a personalised interview.

An introduction to Switzerland’s savings and investment market

By Robbin Davies - Topics: Moving to Switzerland, Pillar 3a, Switzerland
This article is published on: 25th February 2020

25.02.20

Welcome to this first edition of our Blog, which by way of introduction is intended not only to bring a little clarity into the fiscal options for newly arrived resident tax-payers, but also to share our local knowledge on more family-orientated subjects.

Starting with the financial and tax issues, there are products that almost every household should be looking at, offered by both insurance companies and local banks. For someone working and paying taxes in Switzerland these are the “Pillar 3a” tax-deductible segregated savings accounts. Those issued by Swiss-based insurance companies offer a further benefit in that life insurance and disability cover can be included in the package, although the structure is slightly different. It is worthwhile getting independent advice to ensure you are getting value for money and that the product is suitable for your goal.

The amount that can be invested and remain tax-deductible changes each year, subject to inflation, but for the 2020 tax year it is CHF 6,826, available to anyone gainfully employed and who has a pension plan. For those who are earning and do not have a corporate pension fund, this allowance is increased up to CHF 34,128 this fiscal year, up to a maximum of 20% of net income. If this sounds a little complicated, it’s a sector where The Spectrum-IFA Group has plenty of experience!

Most expatriates set up supplementary retirement savings accounts – provided this is within the scope of the above restrictions – and still enjoy certain tax advantages. All the major Swiss banks are keen to compete in attracting new clients, and it really does pay to shop around. Having some professional and independent advice is obviously helpful, but various local government agencies are also able to point you in the right direction (although not always in English!).

As you probably already realise, dear reader, there are a myriad of local, regional and federal regulations which encompass everything from reduced price rail tickets given out by the commune where you live, to the requirement to pay for the refuse sacks which you deposit at the local collection point, down to local festivities which often include wine, food and of course music, offered by the commune (but paid for out of the tax you pay to the commune). Very little is free in this country.

Being centrally situated on the continent of Europe, travel for Swiss-residents looking to move around is both easy and usually punctual, but expensive. Splashing out for a 50% discount rail card can be well worth the while if you use the trains on a regular basis, and with the help of the internet, bargain flights, hotels and holidays are becoming far more reasonable and competitive. Having lived here for over 25 years, I am well-placed to give you some good suggestions and tips!

This Blog will be regularly updated with the latest news and any relative cultural and administrative events – we look forward to hearing from you!

Swiss taxes and various deductions

By Robbin Davies - Topics: Pillar 3a, Switzerland, Tax, wealth management
This article is published on: 1st February 2020

01.02.20

This document is intended for information purposes only and does not constitute tax advice. The intention is to highlight that there are a number of financial planning opportunities available and that professional assistance in completing your tax-return is a very good idea. The Spectrum IFA Group can assist you with Pillar 3a tax-deductable savings, arrange a mortgage that is tax-optimised and help you with other forms of financial planning that are tax-efficient. We have certified accounting partners who speak English and will take care of your full tax return from 500 francs, including questions throughout the year.

The calculation of tax throughout Switzerland is based on the net income of the taxpayer. As in most countries, there are several deductions that can be made on your tax declaration. These will, in turn, reduce your taxable income, and therefore the amount of tax you pay.

Although deductions for the direct federal tax are the same throughout Switzerland, deductions at the cantonal and communal levels are regulated differently. Together with all local tax rates, there are frequently large differences between communes, and this should be borne in mind when deciding on where you wish to live, even in the same canton. Switzerland has been at the forefront of internet-based dissemination of information, and generally the relevant information on deductible amounts for your canton and commune can be found on the individual canton’s website, and frequently in English.

Clearly, to claim any of the available reductions in tax-liability, the necessary and supporting paperwork must be submitted with the tax return.

The following are the most important and frequently used, fully compliant and legal deductions.

Work related expenses: Employed persons can deduct work related expenses such as the cost for commuting to work. As a rule, bus and train passes (up to a certain limit) and a flat amount for bicycles, mopeds and scooters are all included under commuting expenses. Under certain conditions, the kilometres driven to the workplace can be deducted when one is using a private vehicle, but there are usually limits both in minimum and maximum distances.

Other work-related expenses include the cost for meals during the working day. Provided one cannot go home for lunch (i.e. there is a minimum distance from the place of work and the tax-payers domicile) these expenses can be deducted from income up to a certain maximum amount, which in turn varies from canton to canton. Additional deductions are also possible for shift or night work. For further work-related expenses such as the cost for work-specific clothing (such as suits), tools or other professional requirements there is a flat rate deduction. If the actual costs can be proven to be higher than the flat rate deduction (which would therefor require receipts to be attached with the tax declaration as supporting evidence) the tax-payer may often deduct the actual costs.

Payments into a pillar 3a: Payments into pillar 3a accounts are tax deductible up to the maximum allowed amount for those residents in Switzerland who have a taxable income. For employees with an employer-provided pension plan, the maximum allowed amount for 2020/21 is 6,826 francs. Self- employed people, and those without an employer-provided pension plan, are allowed to contribute up to 20% of their net income, up to a maximum of 34,128 francs in 2020/21. These maximum allowable deductions are reviewed every 2 years in line with inflation. The tax savings resulting from paying into a pillar 3a are that the taxpayer’s gross income has been reduced by these amounts and are ergo “tax fee”.

Bank vs. Insurance: It should be noted that there are two principal types of 3a. Those provided by banks, where there is no obligation to make a payment during any tax year, and those offered by insurance companies, where the contractual agreement is for a regular annual premium to be paid (this can be made monthly, quarterly, semi-annually or annually). The advantage of the bank 3a is that you are free to pay in or not, depending on your financial circumstances. One down-side is that there is no guarantee on the value of your policy at a later date, as it is always subject to the performance of the bank’s 3a funds. One of the great advantages of an insurance-driven product is that it comes with added life insurance, and also a guaranteed minimum performance and future minimum cash-in values. These insurance policies are also accepted for the amortisation of mortgage debt. On the downside, as there are certain charges taken out of the first annual premium at the very beginning, they should not be entered into without discussion with a qualified expert, and never to be taken for an anticipated term shorter than 5-7 years. Both types of product have federally-governed restrictions on accessing these funds before retirement age, although transfers to other retirement pots are permitted.

Interest Payments: Interest – for example for mortgages or on loans – may be deducted from income. This would apply only to interest and not for repayment of principal used to reduce a loan (amortisation of a mortgage for example). Leasing costs on cars may only be deducted when the individual is classified as self-employed.

Expenses due to illness and accidents: Certain expenses for medical services, which were not covered by your health insurance, can be approved as being tax deductible.

Insurance premiums: Premiums for health, accident, life and pension insurance can often be deducted – up to a certain amount.

Reclaiming withholding tax: When bank or savings account interest is credited, under some circumstances only 65% is credited. In this case the bank transfers 35% of the interest to the tax authorities. On providing the account numbers on the tax declaration, the withholding tax is reimbursed. Withholding tax is applied only to accounts for which the amount of interest exceeds 200 francs. In addition to interest from accounts, interest from other sources such as bonds (including medium-term notes), lottery winnings (starting at 50 francs) and dividend payments are subject to withholding tax, but can often be adjusted to the individual’s marginal tax rate.

Contributions to political parties: Members of a political party may deduct contributions, up to a ceiling.

Contributions to non-profit organisations: Donations to non-profit organisations can usually be deducted. Ask in advance.

Disability costs: People with physical or mental disabilities can make certain deductions for additional expenses. Various organisations throughout Switzerland offer free consultation on this matter as to what might be covered, and at local communal level they are also able to give contact details.

Alimony payments: Alimony payments for children and ex-partners can be deducted in full from gross income.

Charitable donations: Provided the charity is Swiss-registered, the minimum donation is 200 francs, but you may make donations up to 20% of your income.

Deduction for children: Generally a deduction can be made for every child who is under the age of 18, or at further education or still in their initial professional training up to age of 25.

Finally, and this is a typically « Swiss » feature

If you pre-pay your taxes you receive some interest: You can benefit from paying your taxes in advance. This is because the tax authorities pay interest on pre-paid tax payments. This interest is generally higher than the current low interest rates of banks. Clearly not everyone has sufficient liquidity to be able to cover a full year, but even agreeing to pay a partial sum in advance is a good way to make a little extra money.

The Spectrum IFA Group: A corporate partner, a generous friend

By Spectrum IFA - Topics: Belgium, corporate responsibility, France, Italy, Spain, Spectrum-IFA Group, Switzerland
This article is published on: 16th May 2019

16.05.19

As a small NGO, Street Child EU is always on the lookout to build relationships with corporate partners as a means of strengthening our long-term fundraising ambitions. We are always grateful when, after approaching an organisation, they take the time to contemplate our vision and give consideration for the potential benefits of our projects. Yet, even with our proven track-record, this is a competitive industry, and securing regular funding is a painstaking and uncertain process. Thankfully, every so often, we encounter a corporate organisation that immediately identifies with our philosophy and subsequently demonstrates an admirable commitment to transforming our ambitions into reality – The Spectrum IFA Group is one such case.

Over the years, this Financial Services Organisation, has shown an unwavering dedication to providing hope to some of the world’s most marginalised groups and disadvantaged children, their donations to Street Child thus far reached 14,000 € . Street Child’s relationship with The Spectrum IFA Group stretches back to 2016, when they provided us with a generous donation for our Girls Speak Out programme. This project was set in the difficult context of post-ebola Sierra Leone and Liberia. Our mission aimed to support at least 20,000 girls to access and sustainably remain in quality education. When The Spectrum IFA Group provided us with 3,750 € we could immediately family business grants for the Street Child team in the capital of Sierra Leone, central Freetown. This meant that 65 individual caregivers were given the means to protect and nurture the vulnerable children in their care. The grant also enabled an extra 65 girls and 65 of their siblings to attend school – totalling 130 children for whom education had previously been out of reach. Moreover, the donation has had a wider impact of providing an additional 195 family members with access to an increased income. Overall, this has been a great source of optimism in the community, wedging open a door of opportunity for future generations of children in Freetown.

In 2017, The Spectrum IFA Group once again willingly answered Street Child’s call to action by providing support for our Breaking the Bonds Project in Nepal. Street Child was implementing an ambitious plan to reverse the effects that decades of discrimination have inflicted upon the Musahar community. With a donation of 5,000 € we made great strides in our efforts to free Musahars from bonded labour and disrupt this cycle of poverty. The donation has enabled 27 Musahar girls to complete our livelihoods support program which, through a careful combination of business skills training and life skills workshops, has given these Musuhars the resources and skills needed to propel them towards economic independence. In 2018, The Spectrum IFA Group reiterated their support for the Musahar community by donating an extra 3,000 € to the cause.

This organisation has always been interested in receiving project updates from the field, and we have always happy to oblige with photographs and case studies. They have kindly used these materials to show off during presentations at company events, encouraging even more donations by The Spectrum IFA Group’s staff. It is important for us that our corporate partners show off the projects they have funded with this kind of pride. It is important that corporate organisations engage with NGOs out of a genuine interest in social progress and The Spectrum IFA Group clearly does so.

All to often corporate partnerships cannot stand the test of time, but the relationship between The Spectrum IFA Group and Street Child is strong and looks set to stay. We have already shared positive initial conversations in relation to our new project in Afghanistan and furthermore, an extra 2000 € donation already indicated for a new Musahar project. We are tremendously grateful for the trust and support The Spectrum IFA Group has continuously offered us. Our experience with The Spectrum IFA Group is a testament to the fact that the NGOs and Corporate organisations can positively bridge the gap between these differing industries in order to pursue a common goal.

1

Soti, a Musahar in Nepal has benefitted from business skills training to establish a steady income for herself and her children.

2

In Central Freetown, Sierra Leone, Aminata been supported through the Girls Speak Out programme. She can now attend School regularly and has aspirations to one day become a teacher

*Note: The names of individuals have been changed to protect their privacy and identity

New QROPS tax charge for 2017 – Will this change after BREXIT?

By Spectrum IFA - Topics: Belgium, BREXIT, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, pension transfer, Pensions, Portugal, QROPS, Retirement, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom
This article is published on: 20th April 2018

20.04.18

In the Spring 2017 Budget, the UK government announced its intention to introduce a new 25% Overseas Transfer Charge (OTC) on QROPS transfers taking place on or after 9th March 2017. The HMRC Guidance indicates that the OTC will not be applied in the following situations:

  • the QROPS is in the European Union (EU) or EEA and the member is also resident in an EU or EEA country (not necessarily the same EU or EEA country);
  • the QROPS and the member is in the same country; or
  • the QROPS is an employer sponsored occupational pension scheme, overseas public service pension scheme or a pension scheme established by an International Organisation (for example, the United Nations, the EU, i.e. not just a multinational company), and the member is an employee of the entity to which the benefits are transferred to its pension scheme.

It is also intended that the above provisions will apply to transfers from one QROPS (or former QROPS) to another, if this is within five full tax years from the date of the original transfer of benefits from the UK pension scheme to the first QROPS arrangement.

Nevertheless, it is clear that taking professional regulated advice is essential. This includes if you have already transferred benefits to a QROPS and you are planning to move to another country of residence.

It is important to explore your options now while you still have the chance as who knows what changes will come with BREXIT. Contact you’re local adviser for a FREE consultation and to discuss your personal options

EU Pension Transfer from the EU Institutions – It is EUr money

By Emeka Ajogbe - Topics: Belgium, EU Pension Transfer, France, Luxembourg, pension transfer, Retirement, Switzerland
This article is published on: 15th August 2017

15.08.17

Have you ever worked for any of the below institutions for less than 10 years? Go ahead, and have a look:

• European Commission
• European Council
• European Parliament
• EEAS
• European Court of Justice
• Eurocontrol

If yes, then carrying on reading this article, as an EU Pension Transfer will definitely be of interest to you. If not, then you’ll probably want to stop reading, unless you know someone in the aforementioned position.

To Whom It May Concern, if you have worked for less than 10 years at the EU Institutions (and have left), you will not have qualified for the gold plated, much coveted, EU Pension. I say much coveted, as no one is really making pensions like them anymore; as they are very, very expensive for the employer to maintain. Yet, they can be very, very good for you, the employee. Anyway, I digress. That is for another article.

As you will know by now, you have to work at the EU Institutions for at least 10 years (this can be interrupted, as long as the total is 10 years) before you qualify for the pension. If you leave before that time, then you are eligible for a severance grant which you can transfer into a scheme that has been approved by the EU. As it states in the EU Staff Regulations handbook:

“An official aged less than the pensionable age whose service terminates otherwise than by reason of death or invalidity and who is not entitled to an immediate or deferred retirement pension shall be entitled on leaving the service:

a. where he has completed less than one year’s service and has not made use of the arrangement laid down in Article 11(2), to payment of a severance grant equal to three times the amounts withheld from his basic salary in respect of his pension contributions, after deduction of any amounts paid under Articles 42 and 112 of the Conditions of Employment of Other Servants;

b. in other cases, to the benefits provided under Article 11(1) or to the payment of the actuarial equivalent of such benefits to a private insurance company or pension fund of his choice, on condition that such company or fund guarantees that:

I. the capital will not be repaid;
II. a monthly income will be paid from age 60 at the earliest and age 66 at the latest;
III. provisions are included for reversion or survivors’ pensions;
IV. transfer to another insurance company or other fund will be authorised only if such fund fulfils the conditions laid down in points I, II and III.”

The last 4 points are the most important to note as your money will not be transferred unless the approved receiving organisation adheres to those criteria.

WHY WOULD I TRANSFER?
Essentially, you have to, unless you like losing large sums of money. If you have not transferred by the time you have reached pensionable age, then your money disappears and is absorbed by the EU. If you die before you claim your money, then it is also lost. It will not be transferred to any beneficiaries as it is not a pension. When you leave, the amount that you leave behind is frozen and only increases at a very low interest rate; no further contributions are made on your behalf. So moving it when you leave allows you the opportunity to invest it into funds that could grow your money substantially over the years (depending on how close you are to retirement). For example, if you left the institutions at 40 years old, you would have at least 25 more years to grow your money. If you leave earlier, then you would have longer.

Moving it would also allow you better protect your financial future, make provisions for your partner or dependents/beneficiaries. It can be of benefit even if you decide to return to the EU Institutions.

There may be circumstances where it is not appropriate for you to transfer the money at that time, your particular situation will be evaluated by our pension specialist who will compile a report detailing the appropriateness of the potential transfer.

SOUNDS GREAT! WHAT NEXT?
We will conduct an evaluation of your situation and also the accumulation of your money at the EU. Once we have confirmed and agreed with you that transferring out is the right option for you, we will work with an approved provider to who complies with the requirements as stated above who will help set up your new pension. Then, as part of our ongoing service, we will review your pension and personal circumstances every quarter to ensure that you are always updated with the latest information. Even if you move countries, our service will continue.

We have established contacts with case handlers in the Office for the Administration and Payment of Individual Entitlements (the department responsible for calculating and transferring your money), and have developed the knowledge and expertise to ensure a smooth transfer, putting you in control of your money and helping you make the right decisions, as and when they are needed.

So, if you have no longer work for the EU Institutions and have less than 10 years’ service, you don’t like losing large sums of money, wish to protect your financial future, and potentially provide for your dependents/beneficiaries, then contact me either by email: emeka.ajogbe@spectrum-ifa.com or phone: +32 494 90 71 72 to see whether an EU Pension Transfer is suitable for you.

Le Tour de Finance heads to Switzerland

By Spectrum-IFA - Topics: Le Tour de Finance, Pillar 3a, Switzerland, Uncategorised
This article is published on: 21st September 2016

21.09.16

Le Tour de Finance, 29th September Nyon, Switzerland.

“Three ways to save tax”

 

What is Le Tour de Finance?

Are you interested in finding out how to make the most of your money in France, Spain or Italy? Do you have pressing questions about making international payments, pensions, tax, wealth or the healthcare system? Why not take the time and come to a local event, bring some friends and make it a great day out?

Le Tour de Finance is the financial forum for expats which will help you with a range of different financial products and services. Just as Le Tour de France takes a route throughout the regions of France, so too does Le Tour de Finance, but we also visit Italy, Spain, Switzerland and Belgium. We want to reach expats where you live so that you can seek advice particular to your local area. Tax advice, pensions, mortgages, healthcare, schools, business advice and making the most of your assets are just some of the subjects that expats need to know more about. Le Tour de Finance is the ideal opportunity to find answers to the most pressing questions facing people living in France, Spain or Italy.

The forum will bring together key players who assist expats settling or already living in these countries. It will also be an ideal opportunity to socialise by enjoying a free Buffet lunch and meeting people in similar circumstances in your neighbourhood.

As an expat, do you make the most out of your finances?
Come and join us for expert advice and to meet other like-minded expats in your local area. The event starts at 18.45 with a welcome drink, followed by some brief presentations from experts on a range of topics that could affect you now, or in the future. This engaging events ends at 20:30 with drinks and canapes and a chance to meet the experts and hopefully make some new friends.

Register for this FREE event or for further ­information, by sending an email with your full contact details to: seminars@ltdf.eu, register online or call +33(0)4 22 32 62 40

Where:
Le Caveau de Nyon
Château de Nyon, Place du Château,
1260 Nyon,Switzerland

When:
29th September, 2016
The event starts at 18.45 and ends at 20.30 with drinks and canapes.

What:
Brief presentations on a range of topics including: Tax efficient planning: for Frontaliers and Swiss residents; Why you need a Swiss Will!, Transfers between currencies: beat the bank margins!, Wealth management: seeking positive returns post-Brexit, QROPS- the latest rules on transferring UK pensions overseas, and what the advantages may be, How do the Swiss Pillars work, and how do I save taxes?, Swiss Mortgages- how they work, how to optimise to save taxes.

REGISTER ONLINE HERE

 

Spectrum IFA sponsors Freddie for a Day

By Chris Eaborn - Topics: Spectrum-IFA Group, Sponsoring, Switzerland, Uncategorised
This article is published on: 4th May 2016

04.05.16

Poster Freddie for a dayThis September would have been the 70th birthday of Freddie Mercury, legendary lead singer of the rock band Queen.

His final recordings were made at Queen’s Mountain Studios in Montreux, where Freddie also lived.

As part of a number of fundraising events, students of SEG, the Swiss Education Group, a leading hospitality education network, is hosting a fundraising weekend on 14th and 15th May in Montreux, entitled Freddie for a Day, to celebrate his life and raise money for the Mercury Phoenix Trust.

The Trust was established after his death and focuses on HIV awareness and prevention with a focus on young people in developing countries.

www.mercuryphoenixtrust.com/site/aboutus

Spectrum is a sponsor and one of our Swiss-based advisers Chris Eaborn, will be attending on our behalf.

Spectrum sponsors 23rd Swiss Classic British Car Show

By Spectrum-IFA - Topics: SCBCS, Switzerland, Uncategorised
This article is published on: 10th October 2014

10.10.14

Sunday 4th October was the 23rd Swiss Classic British Car Show in Morges, on the shores of Lake Geneva, Switzerland.

The Spectrum IFA Group has been a proud Main-Sponsor for several years and once again this years’ event was a real success with “shorts and tee-shirts” weather, which invariably seems to be the luck of this event!

Spectrum’s tie-in is partly because its two local advisers, Chris Eaborn and Robbin Davies, live nearby, are of British origin and both love classic cars. Also this is an event that has a huge economic impact on the town which is in the heart of the region where we have many clients.

The show itself was founded and has been run all of its 23 years by Keith Wynn, a British expatriate, and is a non-profit event with sponsorship paying solely for infrastructural costs such as posters and printing.

There is no entry fee whatsoever for exhibitors or visitors and the approximate 1,500 car-entrants come from all over Europe to display British cars and motorbikes over 20 years old (or more recent “special interest vehicles”). There is everything from eccentric enthusiast’s cars to “priceless” classics, all of which are parked unattended along the closed off quays of Morges for the pleasure of the mingling crowds with no problems whatsoever and only the lightest of security needed.

The show attracts around 20,000 visitors and the economic impact on the town through fully booked hotels, restaurants etc. is conservatively estimated at over CHF 1’000’000 of additional revenue.

So, for The Spectrum IFA Group, it is a fantastic opportunity to support one of the best car events in Europe (and arguably the very best featuring British cars!) whilst contributing to an event that has a highly positive economic impact to the area and brings pleasure to thousands.

Chris and Robbin had an excellent day and met many clients and friends who also seemed to have a great time.

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