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The European Commission Pension Scheme

By Emeka Ajogbe - Topics: Belgium, EU Pension Transfer, european commission pension scheme, European Institutions Pension Scheme, European Union Pension Scheme
This article is published on: 8th February 2018

08.02.18

There are many benefits to working for European Institutions; the opportunity to be involved in policy making – changing the lives of millions, the opportunity to be integral in shaping the future of Europe and the opportunity to travel. This does not include the generous benefits; such as the good salaries (though those have been coming down in recent years), the opportunity to send your child or children to the European School of Brussels (either heavily subsidised, or free), and, of course, the opportunity to become a member of the gilt edged, well-funded, European Commission Pension Scheme.

The European Commission Pension Scheme is what is known as a defined benefit/final salary scheme. This means that when you retire, the organisation guarantees you a monthly payment (or defined benefit), every month of every year of your retirement, until you die. When you pass away, your partner will receive a reduced monthly payment, known as a Survivor’s Pension for every month, of every year that they are alive, until they die. As you can imagine, this is an extremely good scheme to be involved in, as when you retire, you will receive up to a maximum of 70% of your final basic salary, for the rest of your life, and your partner will receive up to a maximum of 60% of your final basic salary until they die.

The issue is, the European Commission Pension Scheme is not just given to anyone who works there; you have to qualify for it. This means that you must work there for at least ten years before you are eligible. The good thing is that this does not have to be consecutive. You can leave and return. Contributions are deducted from yourself and the EU, and a lump sum is collected that will form the basis for your eventual pension.

However, what happens if you leave before the ten years? Does the money just disappear? Well, no. You can take the lump sum with you and use it for whatever you like, as long as it is a pension. The pension must meet stringent EC guidelines before you can transfer it; see what I mean here: www.spectrum-ifa.com/eu-pension-transfer-eu-institutions-eur-money/

Having worked here for a number of years, I have accumulated knowledge and experience on this matter and can explain to you how your pension works, and help you transfer it should you need to. Contact me below for either query.