Office Locations
Viewing posts categorised under: Corporate responsibility

Corporate Responsibility

By Spectrum IFA - Topics: corporate responsibility, Spectrum-IFA Group
This article is published on: 20th March 2018

20.03.18

Every year, like many organizations, The Spectrum IFA Group is approached for support from many charities. As a company, we budget to support international charities and causes close to our staff and our clients’ hearts. Please find below links to causes that Spectrum thought both worthy and interesting.

Street Child

In 2018 one of the charities we are continuing to support is Street Child. Street Child is a UK charity, established in 2008, that aims to create sustainable educational access for some of the world’s most vulnerable children. Street Child initially started with one location, 100 children and four social workers.

Since then, Street Child has continued to grow into a dynamic charity, assisting some of the world’s most vulnerable children in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria and Nepal. Through creating educational opportunities, Street Child has helped thousands of children lead a more positive life and opened up future opportunities for them.

An important and current project is called Breaking The Bonds. Members of the Musahar caste are traditionally involved in bonded labour and face extreme economic hardships and discrimination as a result. The experience of bonded labour, other socio-economic factors, and discrimination within the community and at school combine to make the Musahar community one of the least educated groups in Nepal. Bonded labour has been a traditional caste-based practice in Nepal. It is found mostly in agriculture, but also in domestic work and brick kilns. Labourers are paid little or no money for work and find themselves constantly indebted to their masters, rendering them unable to break out of the poverty cycle. Despite most forms of bonded labour being abolished by the Government of Nepal, over 66,000 households were still found to be affected by it in the seven Terai districts.

  • 23% – Of girls never enrolled in school
  • 29% – Of girls had dropped out
  • 46% – Of 15-19 year olds could not read Nepali
  • 62% – Of 15-19 year olds had no math competency
  • 45% – of parents claimed that teachers were bad or absent
  • 56% – of children would want to go to school if only their parents would encourage them
  • 47% – of children weren’t enrolled in school due to their compulsion to earn and contribute to the family income

We hope you find the information of interest and agree with our support. If you would like to learn more about Breaking The Bonds please click here www.street-child.org.np/breaking-the-bonds

The Spectrum IFA Group supporting Village by Village

By Spectrum IFA - Topics: corporate responsibility, Spectrum-IFA Group, Sponsoring
This article is published on: 21st July 2017

21.07.17

As one of it’s chosen charities, The Spectrum IFA Group is supporting ‘Village by Village‘ in 2017. We were delighted to receive the following letter and photos from it’s CEO Neil Kerfoot. Their mission is to reduce the needless suffering and deaths of children living in poverty in remote rural African villages.

Morning Spectrum,

Hope you are happy & healthy.

Thanks again for the donation to the solar homework lights project, we asked one of out staff to pop around to a pupil’s houses at night just to see how the children were getting on with their solar lights. We sometimes find we offer solutions to issues in the community the community then finds interesting added value additional uses for the items we provide.

We asked one of the pupils on the solar homework project to write in his own words how he found the solar lights.(See Below with photo’s, his Mum looks like she is not to be messed with!) In this case the little boy mentions he uses the light at night to go to the loo. This is really important not to see where you are going but to let the snakes know you are coming so no one gets any surprises (including the snakes, giving then time to slither off). Snake bites at night are a problem in Ghana especially in children who because of their smaller bodies can not disperse the poison as well as fully grown adults.

“It helps me to learn. I also use it when I have to visit the toilet in the night. Thank you village by village for this light that helps me to study at night. It helps in some of the domestic things we do too. Richard aged 13 Pupil from Abenta Village School, Nr Adowso, Eastern Region, Ghana. (The photos are all a bit staged but what was nice and you can not tell from the images is the visit was a surprise but before we were allowed to take any photos both Mother and son wanted to put on their best clothes for the photos/you to show they were worthy of your support)

Me da se (“Thank you” in Ghanaian)
Neil Kerfoot MSc
Chief Executive of Village by Village
www.villagebyvillage.org.uk

Supporting Village by Village

By Spectrum IFA - Topics: corporate responsibility, Spectrum-IFA Group, village by village
This article is published on: 16th June 2017

16.06.17
village by village

Every year as part of our Corporate Responsibility The Spectrum IFA Group supports three very worthy charities. This year we have decided to support Village by Village.

Supporting Village by Village changes the lives of so many children and families living in poverty in Africa and one project supported is to help those living without lighting. The organisation works in local primary schools and with the help of the teachers identify those children who do not have access to electric lighting in their homes at night and then lend that child (During school term) a solar light so they can do their homework.

Supporting Village by Village

In October 2016 they started testing which is the best light to use, they received a selection of solar lights from a friendly UK solar light supplier (At a great discount) and got the kids who are going to be using the lights to write a report on the best one. The one below was the winner. The organisation noticed the kids using it with an old beer bottle so it gave more light and a softer green effect and stood a bit higher, giving more light. It replaced the old, homemade kerosene lights that are expensive, bad for health, bad for the environment and dangerous.. photos of the before and after testing can be seen in the link below.
www.solar-aid.org/assets/Uploads/Publications/Factsheet-KH-13.02.13.pdf

So the money is being well used to buy solar lights, pay local teachers to allocate and collect the lights to ensure accountability and for the staff to monitor and evaluate the project, find new village schools and ensure the effective running of the projects.

More information on Village by Village can be seen here www.villagebyvillage.org.uk

Should anyone wish to donate you can do so here uk.virginmoneygiving.com/charities/villagebyvillage