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Viewing posts from: November 2000

ESG funds and green gardening

By David Hattersley - Topics: ESG Funds, ESG investing, Spain
This article is published on: 10th February 2022

10.02.22

I love maintaining the grounds of our home. It keeps me fit, is rewarding when a job is well done, and gets me off the computer into the fresh air.

We live on the edge of the National Park that is the Montgo, surrounded by pine trees and other natural vegetation. We decided to keep an area that many would describe as wild and unkempt as a “nature reserve”.

The joy of a variety of animals and bird life gathering at dawn and dusk at the pool as their “watering hole” has provided many an hour of entertainment. So many bird species and colours nest here, and visit us year after year with their offspring. In the summer even the occasional Parakeet/ Cockatiel fly in, Hawks circle above on the thermals looking for their prey, and Swallows “dive bomb” the pool for flying insects.

Perhaps the most amusing are the squirrels that use the balustrade surrounding the pool as their personal M25, rather than the death defying leaps from tree to tree. They drink from the deep end hanging on for dear life with their front paws in the pool, and suspended by their rear haunches.

It’s the animals’ natural habitat, and source of food. Pigeons eat the dry seed pods from the yellow Mimosa, the other birds attracted by brightly coloured berries from bushes. They drop the seeds or deposit them via “natural wastage” through their system. Bird’s beaks pollinate flowers as they move from plant to plant. Squirrels store their nuts and then forget where they left them, ie lost their nuts. All of this leads to natural germination of new plant growth.

Of course there are drawbacks, fire being our biggest fear with the latest in January this year that was only 500 metres away. A round of applause for the skill of the pilots in their helicopters and planes dispensing their water drops on steep slopes and the “ ground Fire-fighters “ that camped out overnight on the mountain slopes to ensure the fire did not restart.
Our grab bags were ready for immediate evacuation.

Like everything in life there is a balance, yin and yan. De-forestation also has other issues that impact our very lives. I ‘ll refer to this in part 2, and its quite a surprise. But we have to consider the fire risk of our natural area, man’s need vs environment. It is a compromise that needs “Forest Management “rather than total destruction. This takes time, effort, planning and thought.

On a minor basis this is no different to company investment funds that are moving to a strict code pertaining to ESG. As a company The Spectrum IFA Group continue to add new additional ESG funds to the portfolio of fund managers that are truly supportive of this vital part of investing. The most recent one is the Liontrust ESG fund and we welcome its inclusion.

As this is becoming a vital component to any individual’s portfolio, feel free to contact me as detailed below, or download our guide to responsible investing and ESG funds here

Irish Pensions Transfers | What are your options?

By David Hattersley - Topics: Irish Pensions Transfer, Spain
This article is published on: 25th January 2022

25.01.22

Over the years there has been an ebb or flow of people between the UK, Ireland and also the EU/EEA. There is a strong link due to the common language between the UK and Ireland, with workers moving between both countries. There is a large Irish community in the UK from those who emigrated due to the high unemployment and lack of opportunities in Ireland for many years. Two things changed that trend: joining the EU in 1973 and the subsequent “Celtic Tiger “, which reversed the trend with Ireland becoming a net destination of immigration. It also has led to a change in demographics and the advent of multi-culturalism. However, the boom collapsed, for many reasons, and Ireland fell into recession in 2008, after their banking crisis. Irish youngsters then emigrated to Australia, the UK and elsewhere, to pursue careers or a better way of life.

As the world began to recover from the banking crisis and confidence was returning, the Covid pandemic hit the world. The ensuing restrictions created job losses in the retail, leisure, tourist and airline industries. There are still concerns over the unresolved issues of Brexit and the emergence of Omicron, but despite this Ireland has managed to stage a recovery on the back of the activities of multinational companies, financial services and supported by a domestic recovery, as reported by European Commission’s autumn economic forecast in 2021.

Irish Pensions Transfer

There are many advantages to travelling – one’s perspective changes. But after moving abroad to live, work or retire you might find yourself with pensions scattered across different countries.

So when should you consider an Irish Pension Transfer? If you no longer reside in Ireland it is possible via a Malta based QROPS, provided certain criteria are met. Detailed below are some points to consider.

  1. You have accumulated defined contribution pension plans in both the UK and Ireland
  2. You have an Irish defined benefit scheme and you may be restricted by the trustees as to when benefits are taken, or their choice of investments
  3. You are unhappy with the choice of fund offerings or selections
  4. You wish to diversify the currencies of the assets
  5. You wish to “mix and match” different quality fund managers and their styles, with the ability to change these within the wrapper
  6. You may want to take retirement benefits earlier, between 50 and 60
  7. You need flexibility when taking pension income benefits and to be able to vary these according to your needs or change in circumstances, e.g. taking benefits after redundancy, and then gaining new employment or an alternative career
  8. Malta has a wide range of Double Taxation Agreements (DTA) in force whereby pension income is payable gross automatically and is assessable in the country of tax residence

A full assessment of your needs will of course be carried out to ensure that your objectives can be met, so feel free to contact me on my email below to start the process.

Inflation: food for thought

By David Hattersley - Topics: Inflation, Spain
This article is published on: 30th November 2021

30.11.21

Governments use a variety of measures to calculate inflation figures, but in the main consider about 600 items that are in popular demand. Hand sanitizer has recently been added to the list as an essential item. But, it will also include TVs, clothing, smart phones, new gadgets etc. If one strips out something that is considered by some as non essential or has no need to be replaced, then within an individual’s budget the cost of food will take on greater significance.

Within the food chain costs are going up. Farming and breeding have been badly hit by increased production costs; electricity has gone up by 270%, tractor diesel 73%, fertilizer 48%, water by 33% and seeds by 20%. Growers have to pay more just to cultivate and pick their crops. In Galicia dairy farmers who produce 40% of Spain’s milk are being “strangled” by soaring production costs, estimated at 25% by the Union of Agrarians. Bad weather, such as the recent “Gota Fria”, can also have a negative impact on crops. The complaint from farmers is that whilst supermarket customers are paying more for their milk, the Food Chain Law has not been applied, i.e. “no link in the chain may charge less than what it costs to produce.”

Distribution is also part of the food chain. The majority of Spanish truckers are self employed, but have been unable to offset their increased costs of diesel plus the future cost of automated motorway toll roads. A three day strike has been called for 20th-22nd December.

Inflation

So perhaps a perfect storm of reduced supply and increased demand will, if you excuse the pun, “add fuel” to the inflationary upward spiral. This is perhaps lessened in Spain, as it is relatively self sufficient in relation to food supply and is a major exporter. It is worse for countries that are not self sufficient and need to rely on Spain’s exports and alternative supplies from across the globe.

To many of my retired clients who remember the UK in the 80’s, inflation has again become a concern. I have been able to help them find some financial protection against this for their savings, in particular those that held surplus cash in banks in excess of an emergency fund. Each client had their own attitude to risk which does vary, hence the need for regular reviews. I have access to Spectrum’s preferred investment partners who can provide a multi asset and globally diversified tailored solution.

We do not charge fees for reviews, reports, recommendations or future service meetings. Should you wish to contact me to explore your needs further, please feel free to do so either via the web site or directly using the contact details below.

I’m moving to Spain – When should I take financial advice?

By David Hattersley - Topics: Moving to Spain, Spain, tax advice, Tax Efficient Savings, Tax in Spain
This article is published on: 17th March 2021

17.03.21

Brexit removed the previous rules pertaining to “Freedom of movement, goods and services within the EU”. Those who now wish to move to Spain from the UK, making it their home as retirees or working here, newer and tougher rules apply.

Distance working has added a new dynamic, in particular for those in the technology sector who see that this is as an opportunity to work and live in a nicer environment. Speaking to a qualified financial adviser who is regulated here,in Spain is sometimes an afterthought . However, talking to an adviser before you embark on the journey can help avoid some of the issues which expatriates can find themselves encountering. Financial planning is complex, whichever new country one moves to, so a brief summary can help prepare for the future “devil in the detail” elements. Forewarned is forearmed and helps avoid basic pitfalls.

It makes sense to “disinvest” all UK held assets prior to becoming Spanish Tax resident. Timing and deferral is the key to planning a strategy. Note that due to Brexit, UK advisers are no longer allowed to offer continuity of advice Spain for those that become tax resident in Spain.

There are a number of rules regarding Spanish tax residence, which are briefly detailed below. You will be deemed tax resident in Spain in any one of the following cases:

1. Number days in Spain not to exceed 183 days and may include time spent in any EU member country,
2. Centre of Economic interest i.e. source of earnings is in Spain,
3. Spouse and minor children living in Spain.

moving-to-spain

With regards to your assets, without going into too much detail, the following will apply.

UK property: Disposal once tax resident will be subject to Spanish capital gains tax, even if it was one’s primary UK residence. If retained it will be subject to reporting on Modello 720, a record listing overseas assets. A 20% increase in value will mean a new Modello 720 report. Income derived from letting the property will be subject to Spanish “investment” tax.

UK Pensions: A Pension Comencement Lump Sum is tax free in the UK, it is liable to tax in Spain. So if nearing 55 wait till you take it and then become Spanish Tax resident.

ISAs: An ISA offers tax free growth or income in the UK. They are not tax free in Spain, but there is a Spanish equivalent.

Unit Trust, Shares, Investment & Insurance Bonds, NSI bonds etc: There are some tax breaks in UK but none in Spain.

Inheritance Tax: The UK rules apply to the residual estate whereas Spain applies it to the beneficiary. There is a strong possibility of being taxed twice as estate rules & beneficiary rules are not covered by double taxation agreements.Based on “domicile” there is a different law for bequests & inheritance in Spain. Also, unlike the UK, it has a the variety of laws for each autonomous area,affecting in particular the potential impact of Spanish succession tax. It makes sense to deal with a regulated adviser who is based in or near to an autonomous area you will be living in e.g. Madrid ,Andalucia, Murcia, Valencia.

Having a “ partner “ relationship as opposed to being married, brings its financial own risks in Spain, and arrangements must be considered.

Are you moving to Spain?

Spanish Property: Some people come to Spain with plans of using their new Spanish property to retire to now or eventually. If it is the latter, the property maybe used to produce rental income either via summer rentals or long term rentals, but in this case there will be tax considerations.

Investing an hour of two of your time before you make the move to Spain can provide peace of mind and financial comfort when planning your new adventure. I can provide “Your guide to tax in Spain” that goes into greater detail. Whether you want to send the guide or speak to me directly, please call or email me on the contacts below & I will be glad to help you. We do not charge for reviews, reports or recommendations we provide.

A Spanish regulated adviser can ensure you are financially prepared for your move, in terms of any investments, savings and taxes which can become due on both income and windfalls you may be expecting after your move.

Please note, we are not accountants or lawyers, but we do work hand in hand with these professionals, and can be the “first port of call”.

Fund managers, ethics, green issues and sustainability

By David Hattersley - Topics: ESG investing, ethical investing, Spain
This article is published on: 18th February 2021

18.02.21

The impact of both Brexit and the Covid 19 pandemic have given us all time to reflect on the world we live in. As consumers in the developed world, we are perhaps more aware of the impact we make on our planet. The words “Sustainable” and “Ethical” spring to mind.

So where does one stand on ethics and sustainability? As individuals, it’s very easy to say “we are Green”, but then travel 70km to stock up on our favourite brands of frozen convenience meals. Most of us, due to “lockdown”, now spend more time cooking and preparing our meals at home.

How far are major companies prepared to change too? Coca Cola has announced plans to make a paper bottle and already has a prototype that can be recycled, which was developed in the Brussels R&D centre. But, whilst that is a very applaudable, one company has gone even further.

I have to admit that there is an affection for them as I worked in one of their divisions for two years prior to a career change to Financial Services. One of the biggest global consumer companies which operates in 190 countries is Unilever. “Love or loathe it” to paraphrase Marmite, they have taken what some may consider a risky strategy. Not only do they try to ensure that the raw materials that go to make their products are as green as possible, they have taken what may be considered a leap of faith. Sustainability and ethics are not only about “green principals”. They are insisting that every part of its global chain of suppliers provide a “living wage”, and in some cases double that, by 2030. These include smallholder farmers as well major direct suppliers numbering in total 60,000. As the CEO, Alan Jope, said in a statement on the 21st Jan 2021, “The two biggest threats that the world currently faces are climate change and social inequality.”

ESG Investing

As part of a developed area of the world we should all make a choice. Do we support the ethics of a company that is looking to redistribute wealth and act in an ethical, sustainable way, or do we just look at price rather than value? Have the events of the last year been our wake up call? Morally, rather than just looking at saving tax, or short term political gain and expediency, we should consider what the real legacy is that we leave our children and grandchildren on this planet that we share.

The same questions will be applied by our fund managers, in particular those that focus on ethics, green issues and sustainability. Are they the best choices for the future? I believe so. These specialists have far greater resources than I could ever have to research this “new world” we are entering, and are better equipped to look at the longer term than I am. I would be happy to provide a portfolio of these specialist funds to anyone who is interested, so feel to contact me on any of the points raised.

Lockdown lessons learnt?

By David Hattersley - Topics: investment diversification, Investment Risk, Spain
This article is published on: 17th June 2020

17.06.20

Now as we enter phase 3,are we just beginning to get back to a different version of normality? We all have realised that we need to be around other human beings. Just going to a bar for a coffee with family,sitting outside, spending time talking with each other and people-watching has become a simple treasured pleasure as our world gets back on its feet.

LESSONS

Self -isolation & working from home.
An element of self discipline regarding work has had to take priority, but within limits as if we were at an office. Early research from New York has already shown the following:

a) People miss the interaction of an office environment that creates a positive energy and greater productivity, with the ability to expand upon and share ideas. Whilst Video Conferencing provides a two dimensional picture, it doesn’t pick up the nuances of a face to face physical meeting.

b) The morning rush hour can be a drag, it does provide time to set the day up with a sense of purpose. The evening journey creates a buffer to reflect on the day’s events or relax before you get home. Ensure that the family are aware of a disciplined time period whereby non work related issues have to be deferred until family time/free time. After all, working from home without the commute, will give you more family time and free time. Use it wisely, have breakfast and lunch with family, or more free time to carry out your own interests. Bucket Lists are no good if they aren’t followed through, or if you die before doing them.

c) Dress as if you are going to a physical meeting. One wouldn’t wear jeans or shorts to a meeting ! Learn to control technology and not let it control you, e.g. work e-mails should only be read during work-time. Avoid instant response, set time to consider and reflect on that response, but not in your downtime. Remember when you went on holiday and left your place of work for 2 weeks. Take time out to “Sharpen your blade”.

Environmental challenges

Environmental challenges.
The world is not ours by right.
With pollution in major urban areas falling rapidly, this a chance to re-evaluate our lives and the impact on our planet that we share with other forms of life. Living on the edge of a national protected park has given us the time to enjoy and observe the animals that co-exist with us, ranging

from the evening watering hole (drinking from the pool) to the raising of a variety of families of birds and mammals that return each year to breed, some of which we have never seen before e.g. a cockatiel. Dolphins now have begun to swim in our local harbours, wild boar are prevalent and discussions are under-way to reintroduce a mating couple of Iberian Lynx in our area. Speaking to a client in the UK, deer have appeared at the end of their garden.

As we have got used to only buy essentials, has this lead us to question consumerism? Do we really need to buy the latest gadget or fashion? Can we make do and mend? Repair and fix, rather than discard? In our own household, because we have strict recycling rules, why go to a shopping mall when we can “swap or gift”via a charity shop? We now use local facilities to support the small family businesses vs major groups e.g. the local hardware store. We now buy food that is locally sourced within Spain as much as possible, so in season food has become a key factor in our purchases.

Travel has also been bought into question. Having driven a Jeep V6 petrol engined car for many years (I never believed in diesel) I am now driving around in Skoda 1.2 petrol engine. There is a balance, a yin & yan: what needs to be addressed the social interaction vs unwarranted trips.So careful planning has to be considered. As for flying to the UK to see family is not something remotely worth thinking about, alternatives need to be considered. Travelling by car seems a more sensible approach because survival instinct kicks in. Plane/public Transport or your own personal self isolated vehicle!

I hope that in the biggest challenge that I have ever encountered throughout my career in financial services, I have met and satisfied my clients expectations of the service that I have provided in these difficult times.

balanced investments

But one word can sum up all the above…
BALANCED

It may seem ironic, but the fund managers we use endorse the same principals; they use their extensive collective resources and knowledge to create a number of funds and investments.

Even they are not sure of the short term future, so they are “hedging” their bets and not taking too much short term risk. Balance helps you to take advantage of opportunities, while limiting downside risk. If you would like to dsicuss how we can help improve the balance in your portfolio, please contact me for a meeting with my details outlined below.

Investing for the future

By David Hattersley - Topics: investment diversification, Investments, Spain
This article is published on: 14th May 2020

14.05.20

The start of a ‘new’ normality?
We are lucky to live in the region of Valencia as Phase 1 has started in some areas. Will this eventually lead to some kind of normality and what form will this take? While we have been prisoners in our own homes, the loss of freedoms and the changes that have occurred have led many of us to question what the future holds. With the obvious impact on the environment of less pollution, less freedom to travel and changing work environments, will we change our habits? How will these changes affect our plans for the future? What about our financial position and our relationships with people in the society that we live in? What will the globalised world look like in a year’s time? After all, we’re all connected to global humanity whether we like it or not.

Economy
Without a doubt this will impact global economies. Most economies will go into a recession, perhaps only for the short term, but deeper than we have known for many years. For those of us that have some form of fixed income, investments that are “ holding up” or have only fallen by a small percentage, have liquidity in our finances or have flexibility in our work patterns, we have to consider ourselves lucky.

But what of the future? No doubt there will be changes, but opportunities too.

crystal ball

Investing for the future
It may seem strange to consider this now, but the world has changed. Passive tracker funds and ETFs have produced substantial negative returns and volatility due to short term “overreaction”. Oil prices have fallen through the floor, food has become more expensive and supply chains

have been disrupted with increased costs. Governments will need to recoup lost tax revenue and increase borrowing to keep some economies afloat. Inflation is likely to rear its head, so with cash deposits for the long term returning effectively nil, can these be considered a “safe haven”?

These are the situations that our selected fund managers have to consider. Fortunately they have massive resources available to help them. Who and what are going to be the investments for the future based on a long term view? Where are opportunities going to occur? Who or what are going to be the winners and losers? The fund managers we use are all asking the same questions and provide some hope for the future. Humankind is very efficient at adapting to changes enforced on them. By mixing a variety of managers one can add balance to a portfolio, which many of my clients have benefited from.

Role of the Financial Adviser
During the last few weeks, when face to face meetings were impossible, I regularly kept in contact with my clients via phone calls and numerous video clips that tried to make them smile. I also provided them with current valuations and updates for the variety of portfolios that they held with me. Sometimes these are complex affairs, or may need a simple explanation. I have also assisted, when required, when there were changes in personal circumstances.

But we are social animals and I have missed the face to face meetings, which in my view makes a big difference compared to talking via telephone or video call. Please feel free to contact me for a coffee and a no obligation personal review on anything financial that may be concerning you at this time.

A flight to safety, or an opportunity for investors?

By David Hattersley - Topics: Investment Risk, Investments, Spain
This article is published on: 13th March 2020

13.03.20

I am as conscious as anybody with regard to the above virus and its potential impact and consequence. A recent financial example would be the demise of Flybe, to which the coronavirus was a contributory factor. Natural animal instincts are fear, driven by fight or flee. So how can one consider investment at such a time, when currently 24 hour news channels and the press are swamping us with a savage feeding frenzy of headline information, with many showing a scant disregard to any in depth analysis and reality.

To clarify some facts, I did some research in the reliable analyses from the UK government, “Surveillance of influenza and other respiratory viruses in the UK” annual reports from 2014-2019. The following fact came to light: deaths in England with a contributory factor from the “flu” have varied from 14,000 to below 10,000 in each “peak season” during this period.

Viruses do mutate and new strains appear. With COVID-19 there is a documented risk for the elderly, in particular, those who may have pre-existing medical conditions, but you need to keep things in perspective.

Investing for the future

A simple phrase from Warren Buffet springs to mind, “When everybody is being greedy, be fearful; when everybody is being fearful, be greedy”.
So how do fund managers cope with this onslaught? How can they take into account all the facts referred to above? We live in a global world which has, nevertheless, regional differences. The multi-asset fund managers that we use have the resources to have access to massive amounts of data, which enables them to take all of this into account.

They invest for the long term, with an eye kept on short term risk. But they avoid short term “knee-jerk” reactions, taking a longer term view based on a minimum 5 year investment analysis and taking a balanced approach

So what’s our role as Financial Advisers? In previous articles I have eluded to each individual’s circumstances. Apart from the pure investment questions, so many other aspects need to be considered for effective financial planning including your personal situation, how much risk you want to take and how long you want to invest for. So a detailed fact find has to be the way forward, and that is carried out by us, not the fund managers. These fact finds are free, and are based on each individual’s requirements and circumstances. So feel free to contact me for a no obligation meeting, apart from the provision of a coffee!

Moving to Spain – When should I take financial advice?

By David Hattersley - Topics: Financial Planning, Financial Review, Moving to Spain, Spain
This article is published on: 2nd March 2020

02.03.20

For the majority of those who move to Spain, speaking to a qualified financial adviser, who is regulated where you plan to live, is something which happens after you have made the move. But, talking to one before you embark on the journey can help avoid some of the issues that expatriates can find themselves encountering.

Many UK based advisers are not fully regulated to offer advice for Spain and may not be aware of the most current regulations or tax efficient solutions for your needs. A Spanish regulated adviser can ensure you are financially prepared for your move in terms of any investments, savings and taxes which can be due on both income and windfalls you may be expecting after your move. A local adviser will also be able to clarify the potential impact of Spanish succession tax.

An additional complication in Spain is the variety of laws in each autonomous area. The classic example is the differing laws between Andalucia, Murcia & Valencia, so it makes sense to deal with a regulated adviser who is based in or near the autonomous area you are moving to.

Many people buy in Spain with plans of using their new Spanish property to retire to, either now or eventually. If it is the latter, in the interim period the property may be used to produce rental income, either via summer rentals or long term rentals, so there will be tax considerations. Depending on how long you are planning on living in Spain each year, residency may also become an issue. When holding property both here and in the UK, “Cross Border” regulations and differing types of tax are applicable to each country. Having a “Partner“ relationship brings its own complications.

Everyone’s situation is unique and there is no single ‘recipe’ that we can give to navigate buying a property in Spain. A regulated local adviser has no vested interest in which property you buy, yet will have a long history of experience of the path you are undertaking and will be able to help you create a plan to fit your own specific circumstances.

Investing an hour of two of your time to go over your project with an adviser before you make the move to Spain can provide direction, peace of mind and financial comfort when planning your new adventure. Rules and regulations can change. The potential impact of Brexit provides an example of how quickly this can happen, so consider taking action sooner rather than later.

Why don’t you contact me to arrange a free, no obligation discussion of your plans – either you will get confirmation that everything is in order, or perhaps some points will come up that you hadn’t thought about. Please call or email me on the contacts below & I will be glad to help you. We do not charge for reviews, reports or recommendations that we provide.

Planning for the Inevitable

By David Hattersley - Topics: Inheritance Tax, Spain, Succession Planning, Wealth Tax, Wills
This article is published on: 13th February 2020

13.02.20

The Grim Reaper is not a nice subject, but its finality remains. There are those left behind, alone after the loss of their Spouse or Partner. There is a grieving process. But at the same time is the harsh reality of due process. Wills, Probate, Succession Tax, Inheritance Tax and Death Certificates spring to mind, with added complication in a “Cross Border” society. One hopes that we can offer sympathy, support and help, but trying to soften the blow for loved ones is best prepared for with forward planning such as Wills, Funeral Plans, Life Insurance and Estate Planning.

Circumstances prior to death take many forms. Recent family experience has bought all of this into sharp focus; there was the duality of emotions, allied to the need to help in a professional capacity in what was a complex mire. The double edged sword of living longer applies. Death can be quick, or prolonged due to substantial improvements in many critical fields such as cancer treatment.

“Lingering Death” can take months or years. Drugs can help alleviate Dementia & Alzheimer’s, but do not provide a cure. These illnesses are certified causes on a Death Certificate. What isn’t is the loss of “Independent Existence”. This is a gradual erosion; loss of a lifetime spouse/partner, location, loss of mobility and simply carrying out simple day to day tasks all take their toll. It creates an immense strain on the family, financially and emotionally. ”Long Term Care” often starts in the home, but eventually Long Term Care in a Residential Nursing Home can become the only option.

In Spain costs are substantially less than the UK, but for some the UK becomes the only option due to language and family support. Careful planning in advance can sometimes mitigate the more onerous UK costs and “taxes” or help prolong the benefits of living in Spain. But it is complex and many factors need to be considered well in advance, taking into account “Cross Border Taxes” and differing rules.

It is hard to consider the impact of all the above and many people prefer to ignore it, but I feel compelled to bring this important subject into the open. There are things you can do to make things easier for your loved ones; if financial and legal aspects are well planned out, that is one less thing for them to worry about. I will be posting a series of articles dealing with the many differing issues that I have come across and the steps you can take to overcome them, as it will affect us all one way or another.

Don’t despair or defer; positive steps can be made to mitigate future headaches as much as possible and we are here to help. One of the best ways forward is to sit down with someone who understands the possibilities and to make a plan. Contact me now if you would like to discuss what you can do to make the future easier.